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New French system set to stoke standing bodies of water

The Okahina Wave project is a French invention that claims to transform still bodies of water, like lakes, rivers and bays into surf-able hot-spots.

The design is a floating atoll that produces one epic wave every 15 seconds. The makers of the design say the ride will be a 30-second rush on a hollow and barrelling left or right.

The system works a bit like the floating standing wave like the design by Surf Unit but instead of churning out one wave in a fixed place, Okahina uses a central hub that pushes out waves. So, like Surf Lakes, but spinning around, and portable.

The artist renderings show a machine that resembles a fan, sending out waves from a central point. The machine’s wave-making hulls loop around, spitting out one continuous wave. On the very outer edge of the circular design sits a deep spot and a wall to absorb the wave action.

This design feature of the Okahina wave is key, as erosion caused by wave action has killed this theory of design in previous years. The most famous of which was Disney Florida’s lagoon that in the early ‘70s produced great waves, but eroded the resort’s multi-million dollar beach.

Okahina potential deployment

According to an article in L’equipe.fr, the popular family attraction Futureoscope will add an Okahina wave system to their park by 2020.

Futuroscope is like a science-based Disneyland located in the western French town of Poitiers. The site already has a wake surf cable park, and seems a natural choice for innovative wave pool technology.

The design is currently being tested in the Aquitaine region of Southwest France at a secret location. The system produces a wave 2-to-6-feet high. The reef will attract sea life including mollusks, fish and anything else that feeds on smaller prey that hangs out on reefs.

Although the company insists that while encouraging and attracting aquatic diversity, the design has a natural barrier to jellyfish and sharks.

The company says their system is truly adaptable to most marine environments. Set up takes a couple of weeks and transport is easy. The wave action has an added bonus of oxygenating stagnant bodies of water.

Should the system not function as planned, the makers say they can lift anchor and cart the whole deal away to another location.


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